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The Daring Bakers Challenge October 2011: Povitica

The Daring Baker’s October 2011 challenge was Povitica, hosted by Jenni of The Gingered Whisk. Povitica is a traditional Eastern European Dessert Bread that is as lovely to look at as it is to eat!

I don’t even know where to begin with this post – I made this recipe three times (though I was only successful twice) and I have SO MANY photos, it’s unreal. I loved making povitica (which you pronounce poh-vee-teet-tsa) so much – the dough was really fun to work with, as you stretch it out until it’s transparent before rolling it up, filled with a walnut and cinnamon paste, or whatever else you fancy if you’re a Daring Baker… Here’s the link to the official Daring Bakers post, which includes the surprisingly easy to make recipe and a slideshow of all the povitica that we made, as a group. Some of them absolutely put mine to shame, with beautiful spiral patterns and amazing ideas for fillings. Go and check it out, once you’re finished here, though consider this fair warning that you’ll end up starving hungry. Also go and check out Jenni The Gingered Whisk, who created this recipe from her own brain when she couldn’t find a good one online. Amazing.

To describe the recipe in short, you make a yeast bread dough, which you then stretch out until it’s mega thin. You cover your worktop with a clean sheet, lightly dusted with flour, to help stop the dough from sticking. Then you add a layer of filling and roll it all up into a sausage – using a sheet also helps with this. When you fold the dough sausage into a loaf tin you get great spiral shapes in each slice of the finished loaf – how you fold it and put it in the tin affects how the end result looks, as you’ll see from the great variation in the DB slideshow.

My first attempt failed because the oven I was using (the G man’s) is a bit off when it comes to low temperatures. This was such a shame, because I was so elated by making the dough and stretching it out for miles and miles… It went fine right up until I took it out of the oven, and both loaves had sunk like stones. They were raw and inedible in the middle – all yeasty, sticky dough and no class at all. Here is a gallery of photos from attempt number one, they are many and varied. They are also in no real order, because I can’t really figure out galleries in WordPress, despite having been using it for almost two years…

You’ll see I had a really, really fancy poviticia planned with strawberry jam and tarragon flavoured cream cheese in a checked pattern, which I thought would give cool swirls inside the bread. It might have, too, if the loaf had baked up at all, but we’ll never know. I used the same flavours in my second, successful attempt, but I didn’t have the heart to spend so much time on the design in case it didn’t work. I’ll go back to it the next time, now that I feel more confident. I also included a picture here of how sticky and elastic the dough was when I turned it out of the bowl to start kneading it. The ever-helpful Audax had suggested to us that we should have the dough more on the sticky side than the dry side, to help with keeping it elastic. I did add enough flour to the dough to stop it totally sticking to my hands and the worktop, but I left it stickier than I’d otherwise have done, and this paid off – in one of the photos you can see how far the dough stretched – in fact I had to double the amount of filling and *still* trimmed off some of it. It was so exciting to work with, like nothing I’ve ever made before.

With my second attempt, the dough was a lot less elastic and exciting to work with, but still stretched out admirably and looked a bit less wrinkly and weird in the loaf tin. On this attempt I made the same fillings as the first – the traditional walnut filling laid out in the recipe, and homemade strawberry jam and sweetened cream cheese, flavoured with pureed tarragon. My preference was for the second loaf, though I think opinion was pretty divided. This time the loaves rose out of the pans and the bread was cooked right through, which of course was a great improvement! They still weren’t perfect, with quite a lot of air pockets that made it hard to cut slices of the povitica, but they were so much better, and this made me glad. Here is the gallery for take two – these are less many and varied, but equally in disarray:

Now that I had completed the challenge, you might think I’d let it be and move on to other recipes. I didn’t feel like that at all – I enjoyed this recipe so much that I really wanted another go, and kept thinking of new fillings to use. Looking at the great photos on the DB forum eventually tipped me over the edge and I set out to make some more, this time using my four mini loaf tins. I had some spiced apple pie filling left over in the fridge (I’ll tell you about the pies another time), so I pureed this to use for two of the little loaves. For the other two, I pureed a banana that was right on the cusp of being ready to go in the bin, the dregs of a packet of pecans and a sachet of instant hot chocolate, to make a thick banana, pecan and chocolate sauce. I split the dough into four before leaving it to rise, thinking it might make it easier for me to make even loaves if I had a guideline of what a quarter portion looked like. This was true, though you can definitely tell which ones were left to rise while I made the other two… These last poviticas were the best, I think, both in flavour, texture, appearance and in the amount they rose up in the oven and surprised me when I opened the door. Here’s the gallery.

As you can tell, I had such fun making this bread, and I’d definitely recommend that anyone reading should give it a go. If you have a big space for a full sized loaf, that’s great, but if not you can make mini ones using a pillowcase instead. I’d definitely recommend using a sheet or pillowcase, even if you don’t think the dough will stick to your counter, because rolling the dough up by tipping the edge of the sheet is a very cool thing to do, even if I don’t have it quite as down as these guys.

I’m looking forward to practising more with this recipe, to get really pretty swirls and to get more control over the shape of the bread – getting it into the loaf tins was always an exercise in bravery, as I was scared that the whole thing would come apart in my hands any second. I rolled in right off the table and into the tin a couple of times, so that I didn’t even have to touch it.

My favourites were the fruit-based ones but I saw some great savoury variations going on in the DB forum, and would love to try a poppy seed version, too. There’s also always Nutella, which would provide a ready made filling if the bread dough was enough of an adventure for you. If you’re going to use Nutella, I think decanting it into a bowl and heating it a little would be a good way to go, to make it much easier to spread without ripping the thin dough – it’s like a pair of tights, once there’s a snag in the dough it’s only going to get worse. You can’t even apply nailpolish to stop it. Well, you *could*… but I most certainly don’t condone it.

This is probably my last Rock Cakes post – I’m planning on bringing my cooking and baking blogs back together, to the original Rock Salt blog. I’m hoping to be able to migrate the cakes posts over to Rock Salt… wish me luck!

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